Airofit / lung strength training

I was wondering whether anyone here has tried, or heard anything about the efficacy of, Airofit. Essentially, as I understand it, it’s a gizmo which pairs with an app and which enables a person to do a range of exercises which are aimed at improving the strength of the diaphragm (and thus increase lung capacity). To my extremely unscientific mind the theory seems to make sense - the diaphragm is a muscle, so its function must be capable of improvement with the correct training, and it’s also a muscle which (though we all use it) isn’t generally “trained” in a conventional sense, so promoting a greater awareness of, and control over, it could have a benefit in a sport which relies in large part on efficient oxygen take-up.

The testimonials they cite seem to be impressive, with users reporting relatively significant lung capacity improvements (presumably due to being able to breathe ‘deeper’ after training), but what I was wondering is whether there is any science out there that backs it up. I do know that the ‘altitude mask’ type things (which, if I’ve understood correctly, aim to artificially limit the amount of air available to simulate being at altitude) are considered to be something of a gimmick, but I don’t know what to make of this. Any thoughts?

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Just try some deep yogic breathing!

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Ok.

I’ve got one. And I’m in an extended trial.
Disclosure: I got mine as much because of the asthma thing as for suffering more effectively… to see if exercising lungs outside of Nine Hammer’ing would help.

And I’m so far totally unconvinced. To be fair they are super responsive in customer service though, so I asked them to make it 45 days and I’ll see.
I will definitely return it if I don’t feel they help in any way.

I’d ignore the advertising (I did re professional
Athletes increasing VLC by like 10%). I just haven’t found the backup medical testing regime that proves that (suggest that’s maybe worth asking them for?) and just try it out.

I’m using it as a prep for suffering today for example.

The app has a few inaccuracies about it is one thing - the percentages of your maximum are needing fixed (they know that)
Their assessment of my maximum differs from my consultants definition so that’s odd too
The device itself … well this is a bit like any test … every time you use a device yourself like this there are massive variations … how well did you form a seal … take a proper breath beforehand etc.
But having said all that - in theory training my lungs in a different way has some logic and boy does it create some resistance to breathing ! So I’m Going to finish my trial.

pm me if you want more info on my use of it or such like.

Martin.

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I get a lot of ads for Airofit on Facebook, so got interested, but I quickly backed off. It won’t give any lasting benefit.

I asked DCRainmaker about it a few weeks ago on whether he wanted to do an in-depth review and got the following answer:

Hi Arne

Yeah, I put that kinda stuff in the same camp as those bracelets people try and pitch that supposedly make you do X or Y.

My thing is simple on these: If they actually worked (even at a 1% increase), then we’d see every single pro athletes in the world using them (for free), since 1% is gold medal at the Olympics or off the podium for most events. But…we don’t. We only see mostly no-name athletes talking about supposed benefits.

Most data I’ve read basically says there are some short-term benefits, but, like everything else in the body eventually your body adapts (very quickly in this case), and there’s no actual increase in performance, because you can’t keep applying more and more load like you can other stimuli.

Cheers!

It kind of follows what I already suspected. Since we don’t see any big names or more buzz on any forums regarding training, we should be kind of sceptical.

Also, I watched a video on their YouTube-channel where one of the researchers from the paper the company quotes commented asking them to stop misrepresenting his findings to sell their product.

So, I’d ignore Airofit or similar devices.

Edit: formatting
Edit 2: Found the YouTube video where one of the researchers commented: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njJ5vjvyP3M&t=214s&ab_channel=ProjectIceman
Edit 3: This is the study they’re quoting on their website: https://www.airofit.com/blogs/science/inspiratory-muscle-training-improves-rowing-performance

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Looks up Airofit… how much!!! I have a Powerbreathe in a drawer somewhere that I bought for, what, 20 quid? about 15 years ago. Probably just as good. I won’t say it did nothing for me, think it might have, but I didn’t stick to using it for long. Hence the drawer bit.

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Yeah, to top it off, it’s another expensive subscription service with a special app to help you ‘analyze’ the data.

It’s worse than Whoop (DCR’s review of that service is also quite something), but with the same business model: market a cool looking gadget that already exists in a cheaper/more reliable form (whether or not the science supports it) > make it look really cool > use a bunch of influencers to gain traction > sell a subscription service to use the product > profit

On a final note, breath training devices can train the muscles involved in breathing, but so does normal exercise. So I’d say there’s no need for anyone to use these as you get the same benefits from your normal training anyway. That’s the conclusion from this article too.

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This has also been appearing quite a lot in my Facebook feed and seems quite interesting. Though it does seem pretty expensive.

It sounds like it’s more useful for medical applications in respiratory illnesses rather than improving atheletic performance - though I don’t doubt that some people may see some marginal gains here.

Personally, there’s probably lots of other areas of improvement I can make first before looking here. If the price were a lot cheaper, I’d probably take a punt.