Quiz-O-Protein

HI again! Here are the answers to yesterdays quiz… the comments were really impressive with respect to critical thinking of the topics. I admit, these questions were generated for us to start a discussion and not the type I would include in a university exam!

My challenge (request) for you today, is to track your protein intake and see if you meet the 1.2 to 2.0 g/kg/day recommendation. MyFitnessPal (https://www.myfitnesspal.com/) is an easy app to enter your food if you do not want to do it manually.

TRUE or FALSE?

Many scientifically based recommendations suggest that protein should comprise approximately 25% of an individual’s total daily calories.
TRUE if exercising 1-2 hours per day, 4-6 days per week
Research over the last decade has indicated that athletes engaged in intense and/or resistance training need to ingest about two times the RDA of protein (20-30% total calories) in their diet to maintain protein balance. If an insufficient amount of protein is obtained from the diet, an athlete will slow recovery.

Dietary protein intake necessary to support metabolic adaptation, repair, and remodeling as well as protein turnover generally ranges from 1.2 to 2.0 g/kg/d.
TRUE
Recent position stands from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, American Colleges of Sports Medicine, and the International Society of Sports Nutrition recommend a protein intake of 1.2 to 2.0 g/kg/d (0.5 to 0.9 g/lb/d).

Plant based proteins do not contain all nine of the essential amino acids needed from food consumption.
FALSE
Tempeh, tofu, seitan, soy milk, quinoa, and buckwheat contain all nine essential amino acids. It is also possible to pair plant-based protein foods in one meal to ingest all nine essential amino acids. For example, try combining brown rice + beans or peanut butter + oats.

The top three animal food sources (6 oz serving) for protein are chicken, beef, and pork (high to low).
FALSE although all these examples in lean form are an excellent source of whole food protein and statistically speaking, likely not a significant difference- but a cool reality check that tuna is high on the list
1 = chicken breast (54.5g)
2 = pork chop (52.7g)
3 = tuna filet (50.8g)
4 = beef skirt steak (48.7g)

Chocolate milk is an ideal example of a post-training beverage for the effective synthesis of skeletal muscle proteins and general exercise recovery.
TRUE
Chocolate milk consumption after exercise attenuates exercise-induced muscle damage and reduces muscle soreness. The beneficial effects on exercise performance may be the result of co-ingestion of protein and carbohydrate since the chocolate enhances glycogen repletion.

references:

Cockburn E, Bell PG, Stevenson E. Effect of milk on team sport performance after exercise-induced muscle damage. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 2013, 45, 1585–1592.

Jäger R, Kerksick CM, Campbell BI, et al. International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: protein and exercise. J. Int. Soc. Sports Nutr. 2017, 14, 20.

Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 2016, 48, 543–568.

Potter J, Fuller B. The effectiveness of chocolate milk as a post-climbing recovery aid. J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness 2015, 55, 1438–1444.

Vliet SV, Beals JW, Martinez IG, Skinner SK, Burd NA. Achieving Optimal Post-Exercise Muscle Protein Remodeling in Physically Active Adults through Whole Food Consumption. Nutrients. 2018 Feb 16;10(2):224.

8 Likes

@coach.jinger.g Pretty sure they are all false. I know that 1, 3, 4 and 5 are. Not as confident about #2. This is an interesting topic and I think some other considerations are whether the protein is bio-available and also whether it comes with or without a side of saturated fat.

My nutrition knowledge is pretty poor so I’d be purely guessing :slight_smile: But definitely interested to learn more so look forward to the information!

1 Like

Mmm. Waiting for tomorrow now.

All I know is a (probably pointlessly) consume more ‘protein’ than I need to as my snacks rather than chocolate, and some SUFscience is always welcome.

It’s one of the very few trusted sources of info for me.

2, 3 and 5 sound correct to me.

I heard something on a podcast recently that suggested 0.8g/lb/day protein and that most people over-consumed protein. Reason it stuck in my mind was the mixed units of grams per pound!

Same podcast mentioned the amino acids ans well and went on to mention vegan suitable supplements.

For number three, companies like For Goodness Shakes advertised their recovery drinks based around research on chocolate milk. I used to use it but found no discernable benefit or recivery/protein shakes over proper food after hard sessions or races.

It’ll be interesting to read what’s coming up about nutrition, I think there’s a huge amount of rubbish gets passed off as scientific fact with no real basis for it.

1 Like

#spoileralert

I like the style how this topic is presented! Very engaging. Thank you!

2 Likes

TRUE or FALSE?

Many scientifically based recommendations suggest that protein should comprise approximately 25% of an individual’s total daily calories.

For an average person the recommended daily total is = or < 20% but for athletes and especially body builders I have read papers citing upwards of 30% which I believe to be excess because on any given Sunday the human body is going to maximally process about 25%.

Dietary protein intake necessary to support metabolic adaptation, repair, and remodeling as well as protein turnover generally ranges from 1.2 to 2.0 grams/kg/day (0.5 to 0.9 grams/lb/day).

This is correct according to several different papers. This is the one I have on tap…

Plant based proteins do not contain all nine of the essential amino acids needed from food consumption.

Kind of like mostly no but there are a few out there that are considered complete and the first one to come to mind is quinoa.

The top three animal food sources (6 oz serving) for protein are chicken, beef, and pork (high to low).

Yes, but I believe the order is Chicken, Pork, and then Beef but I also think that varies on the source. I do know that chicken tops the list and I replace Beef with Fish because I am not a fan of Cow.

Chocolate milk is an ideal example of a post-training beverage for the effective synthesis of skeletal muscle proteins and general exercise recovery.

This is not a good choice for me because Lactose Intolerance is a thing however from what I remember is that milk itself has the 3-4 g carbohydrate : 1g protein ratio that is desired as a recovery drink and chocolate just makes it taste good but don’t be fooled so quick chocolate is chock loaded with antioxidants so its ok to indulge a little.

2 Likes

Off to order 24xbottles of chocolate milk and a fridge …

2 Likes

Chocolate milk is always my favourite recovery drink! Although I probably drink too much for it to be anything like healthy :slight_smile:

2 Likes

:laughing: :skull:

1 Like

Solid answers… except you did not give enough credit to chocolate milk! Leucine, found in milk, is one of the 3 essential branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). These amino acids can be used by skeletal muscle to give energy during exercise and aids with recovery.

5 Likes

Cool! Would you be up for journaling your food intake today to see if you meet the recommended protein consumption?

1 Like

Now I am curious! What are your favorite snacks?

1 Like

Impressive, informed response and I referenced the SAME article!!

1 Like

Ahhh. Was looking for the answers and they’re online in the first post !!

Thanks for the updates coach.

Oooh. Food intake diaries. I’ll get mine uploaded if you like.

Mid consumption……
No idea how good bad or otherwise it is …. It’s what they had in the shop ….

Currently at 1.9 g/kg/day - so yup, definitely meeting it and probably going over by end of the day - see -
It’s the chocolate milk …… I was fine until
Someone put chocolate milk in my undisciplined brain

1 Like

@coach.jinger.g Very interesting - this is great info! I am a plant based whole food guy so generally avoid dairy and go with a plant based protein drink after a hard workout with some cardamom and cinnamon. I also eat a lot of berries and cherries for muscle soreness and also watermelon in the summer months. I will definitely add peanut butter to my oats more often!

Huh, yeah, indeed they apparently are. Hey @coach.jinger.g , might be worth reposting your edited first post as a reply to your first post because I know for one that I didn’t see the update/edit.

1 Like